Page 1: Great Expectations

Page 1: Great Expectations
Page 1: Great Expectations
Page 1: Great Expectations

“My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.”

Page 1: Great Expectations collects the responses of graphic designers when posed with the same brief; to design and lay out the first page of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, a text chosen in part because it directly references lettering as Pip searches for clues about his family from the letterforms inscribed on their tombstone. The brief encouraged the 70 contributors to explore, challenge or celebrate the conventions of book typography. Each layout is accompanied by a short rationale explaining the designer’s decision-making process.

Published by GraphicDesign&, the creation of Lucienne Roberts and Rebecca Wright. Each GraphicDesign& publication connects graphic design to another subject area. I look forward to seeing more from this intriguing partnership.

Mind Over Matter

Mind Over Matter: Alan Fletcher’s The Art of Looking Sideways

Kemistry Gallery and Fletcher Studio are proud to present Mind Over Matter: Alan Fletcher’s The Art of Looking Sideways – a celebration of ten years of this seminal publication and the work of a true design icon.

The exhibition brings together a collection of original material and notes from Alan Fletcher’s archive, documenting thirty or so years of attentive curiosity by Alan at large – throughout a career that (he asserted) was made from being in the right place at the right time. The accumulation of coincidence, chance and choice, that eventually led Alan to make the book, will pique curiosity and enlighten minds. A truly unique and personal collection of visual imagery, design articles, factual and cultural curiosities and quotations, The Art of Looking Sideways captures the sensory overload of contemporary visual culture, while also acting as a primer in visual intelligence. This book has long been a source of inspiration for me.

Damn, I wish I could be in London to see this!

The Hand Written Letter Project

There’s always something nice about receiving a letter. Today the way we communicate is dominated by email, text, status updates and tweets leaving many to lose sight of the things that have been around for a while – like pen and paper. Craig Oldham believes it is important that we don’t forget.

Oldham began the Hand Written Letter Project by extending an invitation to the world’s leading designers, design studios and creative thinkers alike to simply share their thoughts in handwritten form on their own letterhead. The full collection now includes over 100 letters and will be on show at KK Outlet throughout August.

A limited edition book of the letters is also available, with all profits going to the National Literacy Trust.

Hunger

Hunger
Hunger

Hunger features 200 pages of Bleed designers interpretations of the concept of Hunger. Limited to only 500 copies, this beautiful book also includes a foreword by yours truly.

Hunger is a word that defines Bleed well. In their 10 years of existence, much has changed in the design world. The studio’s spirit, however, is a constant. They are restless, intuitive, and contemplative. They defiantly question convention and the very definition of graphic design. And although they are always thinking—more importantly, they are always doing. Their output is astonishing both in quantity and quality.

Organic and fluid, Bleed is perfectly suited for mutable times. Their culture and environment encourage a strong relationship with nature. This seems to somehow inform their dynamic range and give them an unparalleled flexibility. While many designers appear to feel weighed down by tradition, they never do. With eyes firmly set on the horizon, they continue to blur design, art, and technology to create a visual language that is distinctly Bleed.

The Geometry of Pasta

The Geometry of Pasta

A minimalist homage to the perfect pasta and sauce, The Geometry of Pasta tells you everything you need to know about cooking and eating pasta like an Italian.

The Geometry of Pasta

The book pairs over 100 authentic recipes from critically acclaimed chef of the London Italian eatery Bocca di Lupo, Jacob Kenedy, with award-winning designer Caz Hildebrand’s stunning black-and-white designs to reveal the science, history and philosophy behind spectacular pasta dishes from all over Italy.

The Geometry of Pasta

Obsessive Consumption

Obsessive Consumption

I’m in Portland this week so it’s only appropriate that I mention Kate Bingaman-Burt’s new book. In her own words, “Our daily lives are filled with consumption…parking tickets, coffee, packs of gum, shoes, electricity bills and burritos…everything we buy has its own story to tell. Obsessive Consumption: What Did You Buy Today? represents a selection of three years of ink drawings of sundry items.”

Printed on really soft uncoated paper that feels good when rubbed against your face, you can purchase Obsessive Consumption online at Amazon, Powell’s, or directly through Kate’s website, where she’s offering a signed, limited-edition daily drawing and book package for $30.

Supreme Book

Supreme Book

In April 1994, Supreme opened its doors on Lafayette Street in downtown Manhattan and became the home of New York City skate culture and soon they will be releasing a monograph of their sixteen year history. Published by Rizzoli, this book is a visual history of the brand that includes an introduction by Glenn O’Brien, an essay by Aaron Bondaroff and an interview between Kaws and James Jebbia. The book surveys many of the brand’s products over the years including projects with Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Damien Hirst, Public Enemy and Lou Reed, among others. The Supreme edition of this book will be available exclusively at Supreme stores in the U.S. and Japan, and on-line April 20th. A general release edition will be available April 27th at Amazon.com and select book stores.

Supreme Book
Supreme Book

Go Faster

Go Faster

Perhaps it’s my childhood fascination with Hot Wheels or the fact that the book includes the famous Porsche 917/20 Pink Pig but Go Faster by Sven Voelker definitely has piqued my interest. Most people don’t know that racing cars from the likes of Porsche and Ferrari were given their looks not by marketing strategists or designers, but by chance. Go Faster is a collection of over one hundred examples of racecar design that documents the carefree anarchy in which they were created.

Go Faster

Via Grain Edit.

Books in the Age of the iPad

Books in the Age of the iPad

Craig Mod, co-founder of Tputh and Webtrendmap, recently wrote a great article on the future of publishing—a subject near and dear to our hearts. We love paper. We love ink. But we also love technology. We love records. We love CDs. We love MP3s. See the parallel? Have a look at Books in the Age of the iPad and consider what’s next. I seriously doubt it has much to do with what we were doing yesterday.

Books in the Age of the iPad

Hunger

Hunger

Our friends at Bleed are proud to announce Hunger, an art book and exhibition that celebrates the 10th anniversary of the studio. The book launch and exhibition opening are on Sunday, March 7th at Studio Hugo Opdahl.

Hunger is a word that defines Bleed well. In their 10 years of existence, much has changed in the design world. The studio’s spirit, however, is a constant. They are restless, intuitive, and contemplative. They defiantly question convention and the very definition of graphic design. And although they are always thinking—more importantly, they are always doing. Their output is astonishing both in quantity and quality.

Organic and fluid, Bleed is perfectly suited for mutable times. Their culture and environment encourage a strong relationship with nature. This seems to somehow inform their dynamic range and give them an unparalleled flexibility. While many designers appear to feel weighed down by tradition, they never do. With eyes firmly set on the horizon, they continue to blur design, art, and technology to create a visual language that is distinctly Bleed.

Via Bleed.

Stuff We Really Like

Stuff We Really Like

Stuff We Really Like is a 785 page hardcover book by our talented friends at Music. Not surprisingly it’s full of stuff they—well, really like. This includes obvious things such as Christmas and Kiss – but also referencing much more personal preferences such as television shows like The Love Boat and The A-Team, zombies crossing the Brooklyn Bridge, paintings by Mark Rothko and plain chocolate digestives. Whether you like everything listed or not, the book is smart, funny and entertaining. Oh, and did I mention well-designed? Thanks for sending it over Craig.

Stuff We Really Like
Stuff We Really Like
Stuff We Really Like

Lacoste

Lacoste by Assouline

Since the birth of the iconic alligator – the world’s first clothing logo and the symbol of its French tennis-great namesake – in 1933, Lacoste has been nearly synonymous with sport. When champion René Lacoste put his favored tennis uniform (a white piqué polo shirt) into production for the mass market, it revolutionized the standard stiff and starchy athletic attire, ushering in an era of sport styles that were as comfortable and functional as they were chic. It is an aesthetic that continues to guide the brand today, with its expansion into casualwear, footwear, and accessories.

Lacoste by Assouline
Lacoste by Assouline
Lacoste by Assouline
Lacoste by Assouline

In an ingenious marriage of adjective and image, Lacoste presents a full range of words and concepts synonymous with the storied brand: Heritage. Well-being. Cotton. Quality. Air. Lightness. Joie de vivre. Iconic. It is an encyclopedia of casually elegant style. Assouline will release the book later this month.